SUPREME COURT OF CANADA CLARIFIES SCOPE OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM

Yesterday, the Supreme Court of Canada reaffirmed that government actors have a duty to specifically consider religious freedom concerns when raised by claimants in its Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia decision. This historic case – the first Indigenous religious freedom claim to be heard by the Supreme Court - raised questions about the scope of religious freedom, and the means by which religious communities can practise and manifest their faith. Christian Legal Fellowship (CLF) and The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada (EFC) jointly intervened in the case.

CLF urges Parliament to retain Criminal Code protections for religious expression and association

"[C]itizens must be free to meet, worship, and collectively express themselves without fear of being silenced by reprisal or intimidation. Canada’s historical reality regarding the oppression of religious and other minority groups – some of which has been effectively prosecuted under section 176 – must not be forgotten. The Supreme Court of Canada’s recognition that section 176 protects the public interest remains a salient one. The inclusion of section 176 in the Criminal Code demonstrates Canada’s ongoing societal commitment to protect the fundamental freedoms of religious expression and association."

Advocating for Freedom & Equality in Health Care

Advocating for Freedom & Equality in Health Care

Do doctors have to change their religious belief and conscientious convictions upon the release of every Supreme Court decision? Do regulators have the ability to mandate - with statutory authority and punitive powers - that change in belief? Or in the face of a refusal to change, can regulators oblige doctors to practice against the very core of their ethical and moral standards?

A Dialogue on Religious Lawyering

A Dialogue on Religious Lawyering

“So three lawyers, a Catholic, an Evangelical, and a Mormon are sitting in a lounge over lunch when…” sounds like the start of a bad joke, but it’s exactly what happened at the University of Alberta as students, faculty, and local practitioners gathered to discuss the role of religion in the legal profession.